Samhain: let go of what is behind you and move into the future with grace

Samhain 2016 begins on Monday, October 31 and ends on Tuesday, November 1

Samhain can be seen as a time for taking stock of the past and coming to terms with it, in order to move on and look forward to the future.

“Sometimes you can’t have what is in front of you if you are not willing to let go what is behind you”

– James Van Praagh

Traditionally Samhain is about endings, reflecting on mortality and also on the passing of relationships, jobs and other significant changes in life. If we choose to celebrate these things we can take the opportunity to ritualise those endings, as a way of symbolising acceptance and showing gratitude, for both having had that experience and for the freedom that every letting go inevitably opens up. In keeping with the time of year we can let those things go into the fire.

This season also marks the fast approaching midwinter, a time of hibernation and of contraction, for all of nature including US. So it is as well to enter this time as baggage free as possible, the rest will be more complete, the inner work more fulfilling and you more ready for the Spring when it comes.

When we are in the vibe of acceptance and gratitude we attract good things into our life. The same is true when we share our gifts, I would like to invite the women among you to do just that –

Women Gathering: A Woman’s Perspective on Self Care 30th of October 2016.

Let’s share an afternoon of extreme nurturing,  lunch then pampering, My questions for you to contemplate meantime are-

What it means to you to be a woman, what do you need to be nurtured as a woman, and what formed you as a woman.

Let’s enter the season of contraction, having accepted and spoken our truth, with more self love and honour for ourselves as women. I shared some of my initial thoughts and personal story here –
with  celebration at the turn of the season-

Samhain: Gaelic or Pagan festival

Samhain, pronounced sah-win is a Gaelic festival marking the end of the harvest season and the beginning of winter or the “darker half” of the year. The Celtic roots of Halloween, it is celebrated from sunset on 31 October to sunset on 1 November, which is nearly halfway between the autumn equinox and the winter solstice. Along with Imbolc, Beltane, and Lughnasadh it makes up the four Gaelic seasonal festivals, observed in Scotland, Ireland, and the Isle of Man. Kindred festivals were held at the same time of year in other Celtic lands; for example the Brythonic Calan Gaeaf (in Wales), Kalan Gwav (in Cornwall), and Kalan Goañv (in Brittany). To most modern Pagans, while death is still the central theme of the festival this does not mean it is a morbid event. For Pagans, death is not a thing to be feared. Old age is valued for its wisdom and dying is accepted as a part of life as necessary and welcome as birth. While Pagans, like people of other faiths, always honour and show respect for their dead, this is particularly marked at Samhain. Loved ones who have recently died are remembered and their spirits often invited to join the living in the celebratory feast. It is also a time at which those born during the past year are formally welcomed into the community. As well as feasting, Pagans often celebrate Samhain with traditional games such as apple-dooking. Death also symbolises endings and Samhain is therefore not only a time for reflecting on mortality, but also on the passing of relationships, jobs and other significant changes in life. A time for taking stock of the past and coming to terms with it, in order to move on and look forward to the future.

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